• Antimicrobial Resistance Interdisciplinary Research Group (AMR IRG)

    A Singapore-MIT initiative creating solutions to address AMR

    The AMR IRG is a translational research and entrepreneurship program that tackles the growing threat of antimicrobial resistance.

    By leveraging talent and convergent technologies across Singapore and MIT together, we aim to tackle AMR head-on by developing multiple innovative and disruptive approaches to identify, respond to, and treat drug-resistant microbial infections. Through strong scientific and clinical collaborations, our goal is to provide transformative, holistic solutions for Singapore and the world.

    Our work About AMR

    The AMR IRG is funded by the National Research Foundation Singapore under its Campus for Research Excellence and Technological Enterprise (CREATE) program.

About AMR

Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat to public health, agriculture and food security.

  • Worldwide healthcare projections estimate an impact of 10 million deaths at a cost of $100 trillion annually by 2050.

    In Singaporean hospitals, currently 30-50% of infections are drug-resistant to one or more antibiotics, resulting in increasingly limited treatment options for many common infections. Antimicrobial resistance occurs when microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites evolve genotypic and/or phenotypic changes that enable them to resist the effect of antimicrobial drugs. AMR renders our current treatment arsenal ineffective.

    The global spread of multi-drug resistant “superbug” infections, together with the emergence of new resistance mechanisms, pose a serious threat to our health system and limit our ability to treat infectious diseases. Likewise, without effective antimicrobials, common medical interventions such as surgery, organ transplantation, cancer chemotherapy and diabetes management will pose increasing risk.

    The global spread of multi-drug resistant “superbug” infections, together with the emergence of new resistance mechanisms, pose a serious threat to our health system and limit our ability to treat infectious diseases. Likewise, without effective antimicrobials, common medical interventions such as surgery, organ transplantation, cancer chemotherapy and diabetes management will pose increasing risk.

    The development pipeline for new drugs cannot keep pace with increasing rates of rapidly evolving resistance. We need new innovative approaches to combat antimicrobial resistance and the SMART AMR IRG aims to address this need.

  • Our Director for Research, Dr Wilfried Moreira, spoke recently about the threat of antimicrobial resistance at the One North Festival 2018, an annual immersive public event and celebration of research, innovation, creativity, and enterprise.

    play_circle_filledWatch the video

Who we are

People

Our unique team comprises scientific talent across multiple institutes, continents, and disciplines.

Who we are

People

Peter C Dedon

PhD MD Biological Engineering


  • Underwood-Prescott Professor of Biological Engineering

    pcdedon@mit.edu

    Speaking fluent Minnesotan, Professor Peter Dedon began his scientific career with a BA degree in chemistry from St. Olaf College in Northfield, MN. He went on to earn MD and PhD degrees in pharmacology at the University of Rochester in 1987 and pursued postdoctoral research in chromatin biology at the University of Rochester and the chemical biology of DNA-cleaving anticancer drugs at Harvard Medical School. In 1991, Dedon joined the MIT faculty and helped create the Department of Biological Engineering in 1998. He currently leads research groups within the department of Biological Engineering at MIT and is the Lead Principal Investigator of the Antimicrobial Resistance IRG at SMART.

  • RESEARCH

    • All things Epi (-genomics, -transcriptomics)
    • Systems Biology and -Omics
    • Microbial Systems
    • Macromolecular Biochemistry
    • Drug Discovery and Characterization

    AMR IRG projects include novel drug discovery, designing resistance-reversion strategies and Epi-everything - systems-level analysis to discover translational control mechanisms of cell response involved in reprogramming of tRNA modifications and selective translation of codon-biased mRNAs for stress response proteins - in malaria and in bacteria.

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Principal Investigators (MIT)

Ram Sasisekharan

PhD Biological Engineering


  • Alfred H. Caspary Professor of Biological Engineering and Health Sciences & Technology

    Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research

    Skolkovo-MIT Biomedical Engineering Center

    rams@mit.edu

    Professor Sasisekharan has been a professor of Biological Engineering at MIT since 1996 and served as the Director of the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences & Technology from 2008-12. Sasisekharan received his B.S. in Physical Sciences from Bangalore University, his M.S. in Biophysics from Harvard University, and his Ph.D. in Medical Sciences from Harvard Medical School. The Sasisekharan Laboratory employs a multidisciplinary strategy to develop tools to study glycans and proteins with an ultimate goal towards the development of novel pharmacological approaches to alleviate glycan-mediated disease processes.

  • RESEARCH

    • Glycomics
    • mAb Platform Design
    • Infectious Disease
    • Cancer
    • Human Pathophysiology and Therapeutics

    AMR IRG projects encompass engineered antibody-based approaches to target drug-resistant microbes as part of the mAbplatform group (MAPG).

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Principal Investigators (MIT)

Eric Alm

PhD Biological Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering


  • Director, Center For Microbiome Informatics and Therapeutics

    ejalm@mit.edu

    Professor Alm earned his Bachelors from the University of Illinois (Champaign-Urbana), his Masters from the University of California (Riverside), and his PhD from the University of Washington (Seattle). He held a postdoctoral appointment at the University of California (Berkeley) and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab before joining the faculty at MIT. His research group is an interdisciplinary team of computer scientists, computational biologists, molecular biologists, and microbial ecologists, which develop complementary computational and experimental methods to understand and engineer the human microbiome. The human microbiome plays a key role in human health and disease. Our research is focused on translating basic science discoveries rapidly into the clinic, where they can contribute to better outcomes for patients.

  • RESEARCH

    • Engineering microbial ecology to improve human health
    • Engineering the human microbiome
    • Non-invasive monitoring of human health
    • Environmental surveillance
    • Sewage epidemiology

    AMR IRG projects include the investigation of antibiotic effects on the microbiome and the clinical evaluation of fecal microbiota transplant for the treatment of drug-resistant persistent bacterial infections in the gut.

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Principal Investigators (MIT)

Timothy Lu

PhD MD, Biological Engineering


  • Associate Professor of Biological Engineering and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

    timlu@mit.edu

    Professor Lu received his undergraduate and M.Eng. degrees from MIT in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Thereafter, he obtained an M.D. from Harvard Medical School and Ph.D. from the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology Medical Engineering and Medical Physics Program. Prof. Tim Lu joined MIT as Assistant Professor at the Department. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in 2010 and obtained a joint appointment at the Department of Biological Engineering in 2012.

    The Synthetic Biology Group (SBG) is focused on advancing fundamental designs and applications for synthetic biology. Using principles inspired by electrical engineering and computer science, we are developing new techniques for constructing, probing, modulating, and modeling engineered biological circuits. Our current application areas include infectious diseases, amyloid-associated conditions, and nanotechnology.

  • RESEARCH

    • Living Functional Materials
    • Synthetic Analog Computation in Living Cells
    • Integrated Logic and Memory in Living Cells
    • Scalable Toolkits for Engineering Transcriptional Regulation
    • Engineered Bacteriophage Therapeutics

    AMR IRG projects include systems-based analyses of microbe and host using a parallel combinatorial genetics approach to define regulators of drug resistance.

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Principal Investigators (MIT)

Paula T Hammond

PhD, Chemical Engineering


  • David H. Koch Chair Professor of Engineering

    Head of the Department of Chemical Engineering

    Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research

    MIT Institute for Soldier Nanotechnology

    hammond@mit.edu

    Professor Paula Hammond received her B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1984, and her M.S. from Georgia Tech in 1988 and earned her Ph.D. in 1993 from MIT. Professor Paula Hammond was elected into the National Academy of Engineering in 2017, the National Academy of Medicine in 2016, and the 2013 Class of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    The Hammond research groups at the MIT Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research and SMART AMR focus on the self-assembly of polymeric nanomaterials, with a major emphasis on the use of electrostatics and other complementary interactions to generate multifunctional materials with highly controlled architecture.

  • RESEARCH

    • Nanoscale biomaterials to enable drug delivery from surfaces with spatio-temporal control
    • Responsive polymer architectures for targeted nanoparticle drug and gene delivery
    • Self-assembled materials systems for electrochemical energy devices

    AMR IRG projects include the development of tailored antimicrobial nanoparticle drug-carrier systems designed to target, disrupt and eradicate biofilm-associated infections.

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Principal Investigators (MIT)

Hadley Sikes

PhD, Chemical Engineering


  • Associate Professor

    Head of the Department of Chemical Engineering

    Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Career Development Professor

    sikes@mit.edu

    Professor Sikes received her B.S. from Tulane University in 1997 and earned her Ph.D. from Stanford University in 2003. She was awarded the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award at the Scientific Interface, 2006-2011, selected as the Innovative Young Engineer NAE in 2017, and received the Best of BIOT Award from American Chemical Society (ACS) in 2018.

    The Sikes research groups focus on engineering biomolecular systems to detect and treat disease in new ways. The principles of engineering design are used to support and extend the practice of evidence-based diagnosis and selection of therapy.

  • RESEARCH

    • Biomolecular engineering
    • Applications of redox chemistry
    • Clinical diagnostics
    • Molecular biotechnology

    AMR IRG projects include the design and engineering of diagnostic tests that can distinguish between bacterial and viral infections in the upper respiratory tract or are designed to detect malaria disease using an unambiguous paper-based test.

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Principal Investigators (MIT)

Jianzhu Chen

PhD, Biology


  • Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research

    jchen@mit.edu

    Professor Chen received his B.S degree from Wuhan University in China and a Ph.D. in Genetics from Stanford University in 1990. He was a post-doctoral fellow and then an instructor at Harvard Medical School before he joined the MIT faculty in the Department of Biology. In addition to being a professor at MIT, Dr. Chen is also a co-director of the Center for Infection and Immunity at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Professor Chen was formerly the Lead Principal Investigator of the Infectious Diseases Interdisciplinary Research Group at SMART from 2008-2017.

  • RESEARCH

    • Molecular and Cellular Immunology in Infectious Disease
    • Cancer Immunotherapy
    • Vaccine Development
    • Humanized Mouse Models

    AMR IRG projects include the understanding and modulation of host immune macrophage responses during persistent bacterial infections.

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Principal Investigators (MIT)

Jonyoon Han

PhD, Biological Engineering, Electrical Engineering


  • jyhan@mit.edu

    Professor Jongyoon Han received the B.S. degree in the department of physics of Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea, in 1992, and M.S. degree in physics from the same department in 1994. In 2001, he received his Ph.D. from the School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY. Before joining MIT as an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering in 2002, he was a research scientist at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA where he studied protein microfluidic separation systems. In 2003, he received a second MIT faculty appointment as Assistant Professor of Biological Engineering. He was the recipient of 2003 National Science Foundation (NSF) – Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award, and 2009 Analytical Chemistry Young Innovator Award from American Chemical Society.

    The Han research group at the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE) at MIT focus on micro and nanofabrication technologies applied to molecular separation and concentration, biosensing, cell manipulation and separation, neuroscience and technology, and desalination.

  • RESEARCH

    • NMR spectroscopy
    • Biomechanics
    • BioMEMS
    • Microfluidics and Nanofluidics

    AMR IRG projects include the detection and profiling of antimicrobial resistance of low-abundance pathogens in biofluids and the surveillance and monitoring of artemisinin resistance in malaria.

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Principal Investigators (Singapore)

Peter Preiser

PhD, NTU Biological Sciences


  • Professor of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology

    NTU Integrated Medical, Biological and Environmental Life Sciences

    prpreiser@ntu.edu.sg

    Prof Peter Preiser is the Chair of the School of Biological Sciences and a Professor of Molecular Genetics & Cell Biology at the Nanyang Technological University (NTU). He obtained a B.A. in 1986 and his Ph.D. in Biology in 1991 from the University of Delaware, USA. After his postdoctoral appointment at Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology, USA, Pr Preiser joined London’s National Institute for Medical Research as a Senior Research Scientist. In 2003 he left London to join NTU’s School of Biological Sciences (SBS) as an Associate Professor and was later promoted to full Professor in 2009.

    The Preiser research group focuses on molecular mechanisms by which the malaria parasite is able to avoid host immunity and adapt to changes in the host cell environment.

  • RESEARCH

    • Malaria pathobiology and immune evasion
    • Plasmodium falciparum and vivax multigene families (rhoptry protein, variant STEVOR antigen, VIR)
    • Identification of drug targets involved in the DNA replication of the plastid DNA of P. falciparum

    AMR IRG projects include defining the epitranscriptomic regulation of artimisinin-induced stress response in the malaria parasite and the surveillance and monitoring of artimisinin resistance in malaria.

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Principal Investigators (Singapore)

Yeo Tsin Wen

PhD, MD, NTU Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Tan Tock Seng Hospital


  • yeotsinwen@ntu.edu.sg

    Associate Professor Yeo Tsin Wen graduated from the National University of Singapore, and went on to complete an internal medicine residency at the University of Hawaii as well as an infectious disease fellowship at the University of Utah. He did his PhD at the Menzies School of Health Research and University of Queensland on the treatment and pathogenesis of severe malaria based in Indonesia Papua. Upon completion of his PhD, he worked as a research fellow at the Menzies School of Health Research and as an infectious physician at Royal Darwin Hospital in Australia. In 2016, Professor Yeo Tsin Wen was awarded the Clinician-Scientist Award (CSA) in the Investigator (INV) category from Singapore’s National Medical Research Council (NMRC).

    The Yeo research group at NTU’s Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine focuses on clinical and epidemiological studies of malaria including the three species most prevalent in South East Asia, namely Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium knowlesi.

  • RESEARCH

    • Infectious Disease and Epidemiology
    • Dengue and Zika Flaviviruses
    • Malaria Parasites
    • Clinical Trials

    AMR IRG projects are in conjunction with the Sikes lab and include the design and engineering of diagnostic tests that can distinguish between bacterial and viral infections in the upper respiratory tract or are designed to detect malaria disease using an unambiguous paper-based test.

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Principal Investigators (Singapore)

Jenny Low Guek Hong

MD, Duke-NUS Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Singapore General Hospital


  • jenny.low@singhealth.com.sg

    Associate Professor Jenny Low received her degree in Medicine (MBBS) from the National University of Singapore in 1998. She attained her MRCP training (Internal Med), at Edinburgh, United Kingdom in 2002. Further on she did her MPH at Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University in 2009. Dr Jenny Low is a senior consultant with the Department of Infectious Diseases, Singapore General Hospital. She is a founder and co-director of ViREMiCS, a viral and experimental medicine research centre that supports the development and licensing of therapeutics and vaccines through the use of state-of-the-art technologies.

  • RESEARCH

    • Host immune responses to viruses and vaccines
    • Clinical drug trials for Dengue fever
    • Bench to bedside medicine

    AMR IRG projects are in collaboration with the Alm Lab and include the investigation of antibiotic effects on the microbiome.

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Principal Investigators (Singapore)

Kimberly Kline

MPH PhD, NTU Biological Sciences, Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering (SCELSE)


  • kkline@ntu.edu.sg

    Kimberly was born and raised in the state of North Dakota in the USA. She earned her PhD from Northwestern University and did her post-doc in the laboratory of Scott Hultgren at Washington University in St. Louis in collaboration with Birgitta Henriques-Normark and Staffan Normark at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. During that time, Kim was an American Heart Association Fellow, Carl Tryggers Fellow, and NIH K99 recipient. In 2014, Kim was awarded an ICAAC Young Investigator Award by the American Society of Microbiology.

    The Kline research groups are working to understand the bacterial virulence factors that contribute to colonization, biofilm formation, and infection by E.faecalis and related pathogens.

  • RESEARCH

    • Mechanisms of focal virulence factor assembly
    • Gram-positive & Polymicrobial Interactions in UTI and Wound Infection
    • Pathogen-host interactions important during Group A Streptococcus biofilm formation

    AMR IRG projects interrogate biofilm-associated infections from various perspectives including genetic perturbations using parallel combinatorial genetics, by harnessing macrophage responses, through nanoparticle-based biofilm-penetrating therapies, and through analyses of the epitranscriptomic regulation of phenotypic resistance.

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Principal Investigators (Singapore)

ChuanFa Liu

PhD, NTU Biological Sciences


  • cfliu@ntu.edu.sg

    Associate Professor ChuanFa Liu received his B.S. degree in 1983 from the China Pharmaceutical University and earned his Ph.D. degree in Science and Technology from the Université de Montpellier, France, in 1989. He held postdoctoral positions at The Rockefeller University and Vanderbuilt University Medical Centre in the USA, before an industry position at Amgen Research USA as a research scientist. At NTU, A/Pr Liu is the Deputy Director of the Drug Discovery Centre.

    The main theme of the Liu research group is the chemical biology of biopolymers such as peptides and proteins. Researchers employ organic chemistry and molecular biology principles in combination with modern biophysical and spectroscopic methods to conduct research in several integral parts of peptide and protein science: chemical and biochemical synthesis, structure and de novo design, and medical applications.

  • RESEARCH

    • Peptide- and protein-based human biopharmaceuticals
    • Practical and cost-effective chemical synthesis methods
    • High-throughput structure-function relationship studies

    AMR IRG projects include structural chemistry design and molecule optimization towards the development of novel drug compounds and resistance-reversion therapies.

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Principal Investigators (Singapore)

Mu Yuguang

PhD, NTU Biological Sciences


  • ygmu@ntu.edu.sg

    Associate Professor Mu Yuguang obtained his B.S. in Physics, M.S. in Quantum Chemistry, and Ph.D. in Physics, all from the Shandong University, China. He conducted postdoctoral work in the Physics Department of the University of Freiburg, Germany, as an Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellow, and in Theoretical Chemistry at the JW Goethe University of Frankfurt am Main, Germany. In 2003, Mu moved to Singapore to undertake a Lee Kuan Yew Postdoctoral Fellowship at the School of Biological Sciences, NTU, where he was later appointed Assisstant Professor in 2006. He currently holds the title of Associate Professor in the School of Biological Sciences, NTU, where his research group develop simulation methods and data analytics tools to model biological events such as protein folding and nucleic acid interactions.

  • RESEARCH

    • Peptide and protein folding, unfolding and misfolding
    • DNA dynamics, DNA-protein, DNA-counterions interactions
    • RNA dynamics and folding

    AMR IRG projects include novel antibiotic development based on transient multitarget molecular interactions.

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Principal Investigators (Singapore)

Mary Chan-Park Bee Eng

PhD, NTU Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Centre for Antimicrobial Bioengineering


  • mbechan@ntu.edu.sg

    Professor Mary Chan obtained her B.Eng (Chem) from the National University of Singapore in 1986 and earned her Ph.D. in Polymer Chemistry from MIT in 1993. Prior to joining NTU in 2001, she worked in the chemical industry. She was formerly a senior technical manager in Sipix Imaging (CA, USA) working on Epaper development. Pr Chan is an elected fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biomedical Engineering. She is also on the Editorial Board of three international and highly reputed journals: (i) Journal of Biomedical Materials Research: Part A (ii) American Chemical Society Applied Materials and Interfaces and (iii) Polymers for Advanced Technologies.

    Her research groups at the School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering and the Centre for Antimicrobial Engineering focus of the development of antimicrobial polymers and nanomaterials for the treatment of bacterial infections.

  • RESEARCH

    • Polymer applications in biotechnology and nanotechnology
    • Antimicrobial polymers and hydrogels
    • Carbon nanotubes and graphene dispersion and sorting
    • Printed electronics – surface patterning and modification

    AMR IRG projects are in collaboration with the Hammond Lab and include the development of antimicrobial polymers that can be incorporated into nanoparticle drug-carrier systems for the disruption and eradication of biofilm-associated infections.

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Principal Investigators (Singapore)

Julien Lescar

PhD, NTU Biological Sciences, College of Science


  • julien@ntu.edu.sg

    Associate Professor Julien Lescar obtained his B.Sc (Hons) from Lycee Louis-le Grand Paris, France in 1984 and earned a MSc in Theoretical Physics and a Ph.D. from the University of Paris XI in 1989 and 1993, respectively. Prior to starting his lab at NTU in 2002 in the School of Biological Sciences, he conducted postdoctoral work at Washington University School of Medicine and Institut Pasteur. With over 25 years of experience in X-ray crystallography, Assoc Pr Lescar leads a multi-disciplinary structural microbiology and drug design laboratory.

  • RESEARCH

    • Structural Biology
    • Infectious Diseases
    • Structure-based Drug Design

    AMR IRG projects involve x-ray crystallographic structure determination of bacterial enzymes and small molecule inhibitors as a tool for structure-based drug design towards the development of resistance reversion therapies.

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Principal Investigators (Singapore)

Eng Eong Ooi

PhD, MD, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore General Hospital


  • engeong.ooi@duke-nus.edu.sg

    Professor Eng Eong Ooi received his B.M.B.S. in 1993 from the University of Nottingham, earned a Ph.D. degree in Molecular Epidemiology from the National University of Singapore in 1998, and received a FRCPath in Virology from the Royal College of Pathologists, UK, in 2013. Currently, he is the Deputy Director of the Emerging Infectious Diseases Programme at DUKE-NUS Medical School and hold Professor appointments at the Department of Microbiology & Immunology and the Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore. With Dr Jenny Low, Pr Ooi is a co-director of ViREMiCS, the Viral Research And Experimental Medicine Centre @SingHealth Duke-NUS.

    The Ooi research laboratory aims to address the critical gaps in knowledge in dengue by positioning itself at the interface between clinical epidemiology, virology and immunology. Researchers combine basic virological and virus-host interaction studies with clinical investigations and experimental medicine.

  • RESEARCH

    • Antibody-mediated protection or enhancement of dengue virus infection
    • Epidemiological phenotypes and factors that determine the outcome of infection or transmissibility
    • Vaccine and therapeutics development
    • Clinical Translation

    AMR IRG projects include the investigation of antibiotic effects on the microbiome in conjunction with the Alm Lab and the development of engineered antibodies with the mAbplatform group (MAPG).

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Our work

The AMR IRG approach

Our projects within the AMR IRG range from fundamental microbiology through the understanding of resistance mechanisms and host-pathogen relationships, to the development of novel diagnostics and therapeutics that can be progressed towards clinical translation.

Projects

Our work

  • Combinatorial genetics approach to prevent and disrupt biofilm-associated infection

    MIT Investigator Timothy Lu (Biological Engineering), Singapore Co-Investigator Kimberly Kline (NTU, Biological Sciences), Yong Lai (Postdoctoral Associate), Irina Afonina (Postdoctoral Associate), Hoang Long Pham (SMART Scholar)

    New scientific technologies continue to advance and can be leveraged to define drug resistance mechanisms from the perspectives of both the microbe and the host.

    In this project, the team will use parallel combinatorial genetics to systematically identify combinations of novel regulators of drug resistance. The Lu lab has developed CombiGEM CRISPR (CGC) to screen and identify novel gene combinations in human immune cells having activity against tuberculosis and shigellosis.

    The key requirements for the application of this system to Enterococci are (1) the ability to perform CRISPR-mediated gene editing, (2) the availability of inducible promoters and efficient DNA delivery systems, and (3) a robust and reliable host-pathogen infection system to screen and then validate gene perturbations. With the recent report of efficient CRISPR editing in Enterococci, the Lu lab expertise in CGC, and the Kline lab genetic toolbox and biofilm model systems, this team is poised to apply CGC for the first time to a Gram-positive pathogen in the context of biofilm-associated host-pathogen interactions.

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  • Enhancing macrophage reactivity for effective elimination of microbes

    MIT Investigator Jianzhu Chen (Biology), Singapore Co-Investigator Kimberly Kline (NTU, Biological Sciences), Mark Veleba (Postdoctoral Associate)

    The traditional direct targeting of microbes with antibiotics is now being challenged by emergence of antibiotic resistance.

    We propose to augment host immunity by enhancing the anti-microbial activity of macrophages using compounds identified in screens of a large chemical library. The team will focus on E. faecalis infection, which suppresses macrophage activation in vitro and in vivo. Combination therapies that target both microbes and host immunity shouldmore efficiently eliminate pathogens and reduce the risk of developing drug resistance, while immune stimulants should be effective with drug-resistant bacteria such as vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE)

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  • Antibody development for targeting drug-resistant microbes

    MIT Investigator Ram Sasisekharan (Biological Engineering), Singapore Co-Investigator Eng Eong Ooi (DUKE-NUS Medical School), Yok Teng Chionh (Research Scientist), Xinlei Qian (Senior Postdoctoral Associate), Jinling Fang (Principal Laboratory Technologist), Yun Rui Tan (Senior Laboratory Technologist), Hui En Jannah Lim (Laboratory Technologist), Qing Yong Ng (Laboratory Technologist), Yuzhou Yang (Laboratory Technologist)

    The mAbplatform group (MAPG) aims to leverage its antibody engineering technology to address key challenges in AMR by developing novel antibody-based approaches to target drug-resistant microbes.

    In this context, the MAPG will establish a comprehensive antibody development platform that will include (i) production of high quality mabs, (ii) functional characterization of mabs, both at the level of target engagement, as well as its Fc-related effector functions, and (iii) analytical characterization to enhance ‘developability’ of mAbs in the context of clinical use. Based on mAbs developed under the Zika Program, we will focus our efforts on leveraging this platform for rapid development and testing of mAbs against anti-microbial targets both in the context of conventional antibody formats as well as novel formats with enhanced target binding functionality such as Bi specific mAbs, Dual Variable Domain Immunoglobulins (DVD-Ig) or with modified Fc effector functions for enhanced half-life in circulation or enhanced opsonophagocytic activity. In parallel, MAPG is exploring novel strategies for establishing stable antibody producing cells lines for rapid translation and drug development.

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Our work

  • Effects of clinically relevant antibiotics on the microbiome

    MIT Investigator Eric Alm (Biological Engineering), Singapore Co-Investigator Eng Eong Ooi (Duke-NUS Medical School), Jenny Low (Singapore General Hospital), Andrea Kwa (Singapore General Hospital), Shirin Kalimuddin (Singapore General Hospital), Raphael Zellweger (Duke-NUS Medical School), Thuan Tong Tan (Singapore General Hospital)

    Despite the enormous interest in the commensal gut microbiome, surprisingly few studies have followed the effects of antibiotics on the commensal microbiome. Moreover, little is known about the extent to which antibiotic sensitivity or resistance is affected by interaction with the human host and other factors, including diet.

    In this project, we will characterize the effects of an antibiotic regimen commonly used in Singaporean clinical practice on the microbiome. Antibiotic effects will be tracked in vivo in a small cohort of human patients, ex vivo in fecal material collected from those patients prior to antibiotic treatment, and in ex vivo assays combined with a variety of dietary substrates.

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Our work

  • Biofilm-penetrating systems for novel therapeutic delivery

    MIT Investigators Paula Hammond (Chemical Engineering), Timothy Lu (Biological Engineering) Singapore Co-Investigator Mary Chan (NTU, Chemical & Biological Engineering), Kimberly Kline (NTU, Biological Sciences), Eng Eong Ooi (Duke-NUS Medical School), Kevin Pethe (NTU, Lee Kong Chian School Of Medicine)
    Research team members Michelle Turvey (Research Scientist), Mohamed Sharif Abdul Rahim (Senior Research Engineer), Sundar Prasanth Authimoolam (Postdoctoral Associate)

    Many bacterial pathogens have evolved to adapt and survive in hostile environments such as pulmonary mucus and biofilms for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA infections. These environments are not only highly protective in terms of drug penetration, but the bacteria also enter a state of phenotypic antibiotic tolerance, greatly slowed metabolism, expression of drug efflux pumps, excretion of drug-degrading enzymes, and generation of biofilms that block penetration of small molecule drugs. The effect of such environments is to act as a route toward the generation of more resistant strains, while preventing response of the existing bacteria to treatment.

    The goal of this project is to develop novel therapeutics that overcome these barriers. Specifically, we will generate novel layer-by-layer (LbL) nanoparticles designed to contain a range of water-soluble and insoluble drugs within a nanocarrier core surrounded by alternating charged layers of poly-cation and –anion that are selected for their ability to penetrate into and transport through biofilms. Attached to these nanoparticles will be novel therapeutics developed in the Dedon, Lu and Chan labs. Characterization of these systems will utilize models and methods developed at NTU in the Kline lab, and provide opportunities for further collaboration with additional members of the Singapore infectious disease community, including Kevin Pethe (LKCSM, NTU).

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Our work

  • Transient multitarget antibiotic development to overcome AMR

    MIT Investigator Peter Dedon (Biological Engineering) Singapore Co-Investigator Yonggui Gao (NTU, Biological Sciences) Xuewei Liu (NTU, Physical & Mathematical Sciences), Yuguang Mu (NTU, Biological Sciences)

    In the traditional drug discovery process, the goal is to find an agent capable of strongly binding to a specific target, usually a protein with a desirable biological function. For microbial pathogens, however, perturbation of a single target allows the organism to develop resistance to the drug.

    In this project, which is based on weak binding theory, multiple but still related targets are identified. Combining computational tools, structural biology and synthetic techniques, we will develop lead compounds that have weak-to-medium binding affinity to these multiple targets and then test their antimicrobial activity.

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Our work

  • The role of the epitranscriptome in antimicrobial resistance in malaria parasites

    MIT Investigator Peter Dedon (Biological Engineering) Singapore Co-Investigator Peter Preiser (NTU, Biological Sciences), Omar Sheriff (Postdoctoral Associate)

    Over the past decade, we have discovered a system of translational control of gene expression in all living organisms, involving dozens of RNA modifications – the epitranscriptome – coupled with an alternative genetic code of synonymous codon usage. Profs. Preiser and Dedon have defined the set of RNA modifications in Plasmodium falciparumand identified two epitranscriptome behaviors in the red blood cell life cycle of the parasite. One involves simultaneous up-regulation of ~20 modifications during the maturation of the parasite, in concert with developmental up-regulation of protein production and metabolism in general. The other facet of epitranscriptomic behavior involved the model for translational control of gene expression. Analysis of proteome and tRNA modifications across the RBC life cycle revealed coordinated up-and down-regulation of tRNA isoacceptors and proteins coded by genes enriched with the cognate codons of these tRNAs.

    Building on these observations, preliminary analyses show stress-specific reprogramming of the epitranscriptome, including patterns unique to exposure to antimicrobial agents such as artemisinin. We now propose to define the role of translationalcontrol mechanisms in the emerging resistance to artemisinin in malaria parasites in Southeast Asia. Mutations in the kelch K13 gene were identified in artemisinin-resistant clinical isolates in SE Asia, while kelch mutations and artemisinin resistance have not emerged in Africa, which raises questions about the potential for other parasite mechanisms to play a role in artemisinin resistance. Here we will define one such mechanism: a link between tRNA modifications, an alternative genetic code, and artemisinin resistance in P. falciparum. Using wild-type and kelch mutant P. falciparum strains, we will quantify changes in tRNA modification, protein, and transcript levels during the RBC life cycle. Preliminary studies are consistent with the idea that strains with kelch-mediated artemisinin resistance prefer a metabolically and translationally "less active" state when encountering artemisinin stress and respond by down-regulating the general tRNA modification levels that would normally increase during the RBCphase of parasite development. We propose to characterize these pathways to identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention to reverse the drug resistance.

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Our work

  • Epitranscriptome-based antibiotics and resistance-reversing adjuvant therapies

    MIT Investigator Peter Dedon (Biological Engineering) Singapore Investigators Kimberly Kline (NTU, Biological Sciences), Julien Lescar (NTU, Biological Sciences), Chuan Fa Liu (NTU, Biological Sciences)
    Research team memberss Bo Cao (Research Scientist), Kalyan Kumar Pasunooti (Research Scientist) , Jin Wang (Research Scientist), Wenhe Zhong (Research Scientist) , Boon Chong Goh (Research Scientist), Seetharamsingh Balamkundu (Postdoctoral Associate), Cheryl Chan (Postdoctoral Associate) , Vinod Kumar Gadi (Senior Laboratory Technologist), Ramesh Neelakandan (Senior Laboratory Technologist), Gnanakalai Shanmugavel (Senior Laboratory Technologist), Wei Lin Lee (SMART Scholar)

    All forms of RNA in all organisms are chemically modified on the nucleobase and sugar moieties, with these RNA modifications – the epitranscriptome – emerging as critical players in bacterial pathogenicity. For example, many bacterial pathogens respond to the stresses of infection and antibiotic treatment with a genetically-programmed entry into a slowly-or non-replicative state accompanied by the formation of a biofilm or, in the case of mycobacteria, a granuloma. The bacteria in this state are typically resistant or tolerant to a broad range of antibiotics (i.e., persistent), with the bacteria reverting to a drug-sensitive state upon removal of the stress. Here we propose to develop resistance-reversing adjuvant drugs that target the RNA-modifying enzymes.

    This project builds on our successful development of tRNA methyltransferase inhibitors as antibiotic candidates, making use of an antibiotic development platform created over the past four years. The first target for drug development will be the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) methyltransferases that confer innate and phenotypic resistance to macrolide antibiotics such as erythromycin (ERY). ERY binds to the 23S rRNA at the ribosomal peptide exit tunnel, which stalls translation. ERY resistance methyltransferases (Erm) methylate key nucleotides at the ERY binding site and block drug binding. For example, ErmB is an inducible enzyme that methylates A2058 in 23S rRNA in Ef, S.pneumoniae, and S. aureus, while the analogous Erm37 in M. tuberculosis (Mtb) is constitutively expressed, rendering Mtb innately resistant to ERY. We propose to target ErmB and Erm37 for development of resistance-reversing adjuvant drugs by structure-based design and screening-based discovery in collaboration with microbiologist Kimberly Kline, structural biologist Julien Lescar and medicinal chemist Liu Chuan Fa.

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Our work

  • The role of the epitranscriptome in bacterial biofilms and phenotypic antibiotic resistance

    Many bacterial pathogens respond to the stresses of growth, infection and antibiotic treatment with a genetically-programmed entry into a slowly- or non-replicative state accompanied by the formation of a biofilm or, in the case of mycobacteria, a granuloma. The bacteria in this state are typically resistant or tolerant to a broad range of antibiotics (i.e., persistent), with the bacteria reverting to a drug-sensitive state upon removal of the stress. This persistent state is a major form of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and is also genetically programmed, but we know exceptionally little about the mechanisms driving persistence. Here we propose to explore the role of RNA modifications – the epitranscriptome –in phenotypic resistance and in the formation of biofilms, focusing initially on two clinically important biofilm-forming pathogens: Entercoccus faecalis(Ef) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa).

    This project has two objectives. One is to test the hypothesis that Efand Parespond to biofilm-inducing stresses by translationally-controlled phenotypic remodeling. This involves stress-specific reprogramming of dozens of modified nucleosides in tRNAs and rRNAs, which leads to selective translation of codon-biased transcripts for families of genes critical to forming a biofilm and becoming persistent. This work entails genomic analysis of codon usage patterns and LC-MS analysis of tRNA modifications and proteins in Ef and Pa in planktonic and biofilm growth states, using biofilm models and Ef strains developed in Prof. Kline’s lab. We are particularly interested in translational regulation of the variety of drug efflux pump families (e.g., Mex and OprM), which have highly biased codon usage patterns and are likely coordinately regulated by tRNA modifications. The second objective is to define the role of rRNA modifications in drug resistance and biofilm formation, such as the erythromycin resistance methyltransferases (Erm) that site-specifically methylate 23S rRNA to cause drug resistance. This work involves the same approaches and tools used for tRNA analysis.

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Our work

  • Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) for eradication of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae gut colonization: a pilot, randomized-controlled trial

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae is one of the three critical-priority antimicrobial-resistant threats in the latest 2017 WHO priority threat list and is a growing threat in Singapore with rising incidence since 2010. There are currently widely accepted clinical options for decolonizing carriers, creating strain on the healthcare system and restricting access to healthcare for a large number of patients.

    In this project, we aim to test whether fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is effective in reducing the gut bacterial load of the two main forms of CREs: Cohort 1 -Carbapenem-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE); and Cohort 2 -Non-carbapenem carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (NCP-CRE). Subjects will be followed using microbiome profiling including 16S and metagenomic sequencing, as well as culture-based approaches. Genomic data will be used to interrogate the mechanism as well as the dynamics of decolonization. In addition, we will test the specific hypothesis that CPE patients will be more effectively and rapidly decolonized by FMT, due to a stronger fitness trade-off in the absence of antibiotics. Results from this study will be used to scale up to larger cohorts.

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Our work

  • Design of a diagnostic test for bacterial versus viral upper respiratory infections

    MIT Investigator Hadley Sikes (Chemical Engineering) Singapore Co-Investigator Tsin Wen Yeo (NTU, Tan Tock Seng Hospital)


    Research team members Patthara Kongsuphol (Research Scientist)

    Singapore's National Strategic Action Plan on AMR emphasizes the need to ensure the appropriate use of antimicrobials in order to curb the spread of AMR. Antimicrobials are often prescribed before an individual's infection has been diagnosed. Accurate, rapid diagnostics have been identified as a pressing need. While panels of biomarkers for distinguishing bacterial from viral infections have been proposed and tested, success with this approach has not been satisfactory. We will leverage bead-based assays that rapidly and affordably provide aM to fM sensitivity in order to test the hypothesis that enhanced sensitivity may yield lower incidences of false positives and false negatives. In a parallel effort, we will simultaneously mine large, existing data sets to discover new candidate biomarkers that can distinguish bacterial from viral infections.

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Our work

  • An unambiguous paper-based test for malaria

    MIT Investigator Hadley Sikes (Chemical Engineering), Singapore Co-Investigator Tsin Wen Yeo (NTU, Tan Tock Seng Hospital), Patthara Kongsuphol (Research Scientist)

    Current colorimetric rapid tests for malaria can be difficult to interpret correctly when protein biomarkers are present in blood at low abundances. We have produced prototype tests for malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum that exhibit enhanced thermal stability and unambiguous colorimetric readouts in comparison with existing tests. We will conduct validation studies using clinical samples, including side-by-side testing with gold standard, PCR-based methods. We will also extend the concept to produce tests that diagnose malaria caused by P. vivax and P. knowlesi.

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Our work

  • Antimicrobial resistance profiling of low-abundance pathogens in biofluids

    Isolation and identification of bacteria from bacteria-infected blood are often hindered by extremely low abundance (~1-5 CFU/ml) and presence of large molecular and cellular backgrounds, so bacterial diagnosis has been mainly dependent upon blood culture followed by phenotypic assay. However, culture analysis takes a long time (more than 48 hours) during which indiscriminate use of broad-spectrum antibiotics lead to increased antibiotic resistance and collateral damage to normal gut fauna with adverse effects. Rapid assays to detect pathogen directly from blood have been reported, but these assays have limited sensitivity and specificity due to host contamination, and can only target a limited panel of pathogens, so they have yet to be successful in changing clinical practice. We would like to address this problem by proposing a rapid, culture-free workflow for identification of a wide range of bacteria from blood with very low abundance of bacteria, which is made possible by use of our spiral microfluidic sorter and novel digital PCR technology.

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Our work

  • Monitoring artemisinin resistance in malaria via functional measurements

    Artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites, which emerged within the last decade in Southeast Asia, threaten the efficacy of the current standard of care for malaria. Conventional methods to detect artemisinin-resistant parasites are either too time-consuming or with limited specificity, or both. Previous MIT-NTU collaboration on malaria parasite detection and resistance generated many promising, functionally-relevant modalities of detecting parasite resistance early (within 24 hours), in order to provide actionable information for better clinical management.

    In this project, we will continue developing these technologies, with the goal of implementing a system that are readily deployable on the field, with minimal needs for research and manpower infrastructures.

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Our work

  • A bacteriophage screening and engineering platform

    Singapore Lead Investigator Wilfried Moreira (AMR IRG) Research team members Rui Si Nai (Laboratory Technologist)

    Infections and other detrimental effects caused by bacteria pose major challenges to human and animals health and modern medicine practices, plant and animal agricultural production as well as food processing and manufacturing. On the other hand, the microbiome, the population of bacteria that inhabit a healthy human or animal body, is essential to their health. Antibiotics or sanitizing agents used to control harmful bacteria do not discriminate between good and bad bacteria. In addition, harmful bacteria are becoming increasingly resistant to these antibacterial molecules. An alternative solution is required for selective bacterial control. Bacteriophages or phages are bacterial viruses found nearly everywhere in the environment that infect and kill bacteria. They have been used for over a hundred years as what is known as phage-therapy. The shortage of newer antibacterial molecules and the rise of antibiotic resistance has revived the interest in these natural bacterial killers.

    We have developed a phage screening and engineering platform. This platform enables the isolation and screening of phages that selectively infect bacterial pathogens. Isolated phages are amplified and purified. We are also genetically engineering phages to enhance their antibacterial properties and facilitate their purification. This platform-technology can deliver a phage-based solution to areas where bacteria control is critical and where current solutions are either scarce or inadequate such as surface decontamination, animal health and agricultural production or consumer health and human medicine.

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Our work

  • Systems biology and genetic engineering approaches targeting antibiotic resistance

    Singapore Lead Investigator Wilfried Moreira (AMR IRG)
    Research team members Jacqueline Chen (Laboratory Technologist)

    We use systems biology approaches combined with genetic engineering to identify and characterize novel pathways involved in antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria. For example, the production of hydrogen sulphide (H2S) in bacteria has been associated with sensitivity to antibiotics with very different mechanisms of action. We have shown that H2S is produced by mycobacterial species such as Mycobacterium bovis (M. tuberculosis surrogate), as well as emerging pathogen like Mycobacterium abscessus. In these bacteria, H2S is associated with multi-drug resistance. Inhibition of the H2S biosynthetic pathway sensitizes the bacteria to several antibiotics. On the other hand, in bacterial species like Acinetobacter baumannii that does not produce H2S, we showed that exogenous H2S sensitizes the bacteria to multiple antibiotics by several orders of magnitude. We are now asking the question: What effect does H2S cause to bacterial system that leads to antibiotic resistance or sensitization? To answer this question, we employ system’s biology tools such as transcriptomics, proteomics, and phenotypic characterization of H2S treated bacteria. Moving foward, we are looking at validating these findings in animal models of infection with the objective of translating them into an antibiotic-sensitization strategy targeting multi-drug resistant clinical isolates.

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Our facilities and resources

Your project. Our support.

The AMR IRG Core Technology Team can provide support based on a collaborative consultation model where projects can be user-driven for technology use or Core Team-driven for methods development projects.
To discuss a project with Dr Peiying Ho, our Manager for Core Technology Platforms, get in touch.

Our facilities and resources

People and expertise

  • Dr Peiying Ho

    Manager, Core Technology Team and Resources

    peiying@smart.mit.edu

  • Dr Cui Liang

    Research Scientist

    Mass Spectrometry Facility

  • Ms Hooi Linn Loo

    Senior Laboratory Technologist

    Flow Cytometry Facility

  • Ms Lan Hiong Wong

    Senior Laboratory Technologist

    Laboratory Animal Services

  • Ms Faeqa Binte Muhammad Rajaie Fizla

    Laboratory Technologist

    Microbiology

  • Ms Nah Qian Hui

    Laboratory Technologist

    Microbiology

Careers

Open positions

We're accepting applications to the positions below.

PhD Fellowship Postdoctoral Fellowship
  • Laboratory Technologist (6 months contract)

    IRG_AMR_2018_013

    Job description

    The Antimicrobial Resistance Interdisciplinary Research Group (AMR IRG) of the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology is seeking a full-time Laboratory Technologist to join a dynamic team working on antibacterial drug resistance mechanisms. The length of appointment is for 6 months.

    Responsibilities

    • · Conduct experiments on antibiotic resistance mechanism projects
    • · Analyze, troubleshoot and report experimental results
    • · Keep track of and maintain lab-wide inventory and stocks
    • · Purchase of lab-related supplies

    Requirements

    • · Diploma or degree in a biology-related discipline
    • · Experience in bacterial cell cultures
    • · Prior knowledge of molecular biology techniques, such as PCR and cloning is desired
    • · Capacity to work with minimal supervision
    • · Well organized with excellent record keeping skills.
    • · Good command of written and spoken English
    apply now
  • Postdoctoral Associate

    IRG_AMR_2018_012

    LbL Nanoparticle Systems for Biofilm Targeting against Antimicrobial Resistance

    Job description

    The P.T. Hammond research lab at the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology Centre, in collaboration with the M.B.E. Chan Lab at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, will develop electrostatically assembled nanolayered particles for the targeting of infections in biofilms.

    We seek to investigate these systems with the ultimate intent of developing promising systems that can be translated to meaningful clinical applications.

    This position is located at the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology Centre at CREATE (1 CREATE Way) within the National University of Singapore campus in Singapore, and is in collaboration with efforts at the Nanyang Technological University.

    Requirements

    • · PhD degree with strong biomaterials background
    • · Experience with polymer synthesis and characterization, cell culture and biological laboratory know-how
    • · Ability to work collaboratively and manage interactions with faculty and a broad range of senior and junior research collaborators
    • · Highly motivated and independent
    • · Good command of written and spoken English
    • · Experience with biological assays, confocal microscopy, or work with bacteria and/or microbiology background is considered favorable but not required
    apply now
  • Postdoctoral Associate

    IRG_AMR_2018_009

    Job description

    The Postdoctoral Associate will lead the bioinformatic analysis of metagenomic sequence data from clinical trials and participate in whole genome analysis. The candidate will develop new approach for understanding environmental surveillance data, including metagenomics and metabolomics data from sewage and river water. The candidate will also prepare and publish scientific manuscripts and develop robust software tools and visualizations.

    Requirements

    • · PhD degree in a biological or related discipline.
    • · Deep knowledge of biological sequence analysis, and familiarity with standard databases.
    • · Python programming proficiency
    • · Experience with molecular biology is desired, especially 16S library construction.
    • · Good command of written and spoken English
    apply now

Technology Platforms

Flow Cytometry and Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)

  • Instrumentation

    1. Attune NxT Analyzer

    • • Cell phenotypic analysis
    • • 4 laser system (R, Y, B, V)

    2. BD FACS Aria II

    • • Bulk & single cell sorting
    • • 4 laser system (R, Y, B, UV)
  • Support

    • • Antibody panel design
    • • Sample preparation and staining
    • • Data acquisition and analysis (FlowJo)
  • Scope

    • • Mammalian cells (cell lines, primary tissue-derived)
    • • Infection models (parasitic, viral and bacterial infection of mammalian cells)
    • • Bacteria

Technology Platforms

Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry

  • Instrumentation

    Triple Quadrupole LC-MS

    • 1. Agilent QQQ6490
    • 2. Agilent QQQ6460

    Quadrupole Time of Flight LC-MS

    • 3. Agilent QTOF6550
    • 4. Agilent QTOF6520
  • Support

    • • Methods development
    • • Sample preparation
    • • Data acquisition and analysis
  • Scope

    • • Targeted and untargeted metabolomics
    • • Targeted proteomics
    • • Epitranscriptomics: RNA and DNA modifications
    • • Lipid mediator profiling: oxylipins
    • • Accurate mass analysis
    • • Drug metabolism/ pharmacokinetics (DMPK) studies

Technology Platforms

Biomolecule Detection

  • Instrumentation

    1. Octet Red96 System

    • • 8 biosensors
    • • Up to 96 samples

    Quadrupole Time of Flight LC-MS

    • 3. Agilent QTOF6550
    • 4. Agilent QTOF6520
  • Support

    • • Methods development
    • • Sample preparation and data acquisition
  • Scope

    • • Label-free detection of biomolecules
    • • Protein quantitation (pg/ ml to mg/ml range)
    • • Affinity characterization
    • • Binding kinetics
    • • High sensitivity ELISA detection

Technology Platforms

Single Molecular Array (SIMOA) platform

  • Instrumentation

    1. QUANTERIX SR-X

  • Support

    • • Multiplex design
    • • Establish / validate new molecule detection
  • Scope

    • • Ultrasensitive multiplex detection of biomolecules
    • • Direct measurement in complex samples (serum, blood, sputum)

Technology Platforms

Quantitative PCR

  • Instrumentation

    • 1. Bio-Rad CFX96 Real-time System (qPCR)

    • 2. Bio-Rad C1000 Thermal cycler (qPCCR)

    • 3. Bio-Rad QX-200 (Digital droplet PCR, ddPCR)

    • 4. Bio-Rad C1000 Thermal cycler (ddPCR)

  • Scope

    • • Relative (qPCR) and Absolute (ddPCR) quantitation of gene expression
    • • Pathogen detection
    • • Viral load quantitation
    • • Expression knockdown quantitation (siRNA / RNAi, MicroRNA)
    • • Rare allele detection (ddPCR)

Technology Platforms

Imaging

  • Instrumentation

    • 1. Leica Instruments Microtome   

    • 2. Zeiss LSM700 Confocal Microscope

    • • 4 laser system (405nm, 488nm, 555nm, 639nm)
    • • z-stack and time-lapse capability
  • Support

    • • Paraffin- and cryo-sectioning
    • • Immunohistochemistry (H&E staining)
    • • Fluorescence panel design and methods development
    • • Image acquisition
  • Scope

    • • Relative (qPCR) and Absolute (ddPCR) quantitation of gene expression
    • • Pathogen detection
    • • Viral load quantitation
    • • Expression knockdown quantitation (siRNA / RNAi, MicroRNA)
    • • Rare allele detection (ddPCR)

Five ways to get involved

We'd love to hear from you.

Terms & Conditions

Antimicrobial Resistance Infectious Diseases Interdisciplinary Research Group

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Error ea ab labore. Reiciendis animi repellendus delectus obcaecati atque, suscipit doloremque ipsam similique enim voluptates et, mollitia perspiciatis voluptatem nemo doloribus. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Error ea ab labore. Reiciendis animi repellendus delectus obcaecati atque, suscipit doloremque ipsam similique enim voluptates et, mollitia perspiciatis voluptatem nemo doloribus. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Error ea ab labore. Reiciendis animi repellendus delectus obcaecati atque, suscipit doloremque ipsam similique enim voluptates et, mollitia perspiciatis voluptatem nemo doloribus.

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Error ea ab labore. Reiciendis animi repellendus delectus obcaecati atque, suscipit doloremque ipsam similique enim voluptates et, mollitia perspiciatis voluptatem nemo doloribus. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Error ea ab labore. Reiciendis animi repellendus delectus obcaecati atque, suscipit doloremque ipsam similique enim voluptates et, mollitia perspiciatis voluptatem nemo doloribus. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Error ea ab labore. Reiciendis animi repellendus delectus obcaecati atque, suscipit doloremque ipsam similique enim voluptates et, mollitia perspiciatis voluptatem nemo doloribus.

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Error ea ab labore. Reiciendis animi repellendus delectus obcaecati atque, suscipit doloremque ipsam similique enim voluptates et, mollitia perspiciatis voluptatem nemo doloribus. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Error ea ab labore. Reiciendis animi repellendus delectus obcaecati atque, suscipit doloremque ipsam similique enim voluptates et, mollitia perspiciatis voluptatem nemo doloribus. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Error ea ab labore. Reiciendis animi repellendus delectus obcaecati atque, suscipit doloremque ipsam similique enim voluptates et, mollitia perspiciatis voluptatem nemo doloribus.

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Error ea ab labore. Reiciendis animi repellendus delectus obcaecati atque, suscipit doloremque ipsam similique enim voluptates et, mollitia perspiciatis voluptatem nemo doloribus. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Error ea ab labore. Reiciendis animi repellendus delectus obcaecati atque, suscipit doloremque ipsam similique enim voluptates et, mollitia perspiciatis voluptatem nemo doloribus. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Error ea ab labore. Reiciendis animi repellendus delectus obcaecati atque, suscipit doloremque ipsam similique enim voluptates et, mollitia perspiciatis voluptatem nemo doloribus.